More Me Too

Just a short post to add to my earlier post on the me-too nature of STEAM. I came across a very nice set of slides on STEAM in K12 from a group of educators in Hawai’i (http://standardstoolkit.k12.hi.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/steamwebinar_pdmaterials_203.pdf). They mention one other version of STEAM: STEAM GLASS. The GLASS part of this term refers to Geography, Language Arts, Social Studies.

So, that makes this acronym the second to refer to Social Studies and the third to refer to Language Arts! I present these acronyms so that you might consider other types of integration to create holistic learning experiences at the university level. And it reminds me that I need to write a post about glass blowing…

Glass blowing at the Spanish village art center (Jon Sullivan)

Glass blowing at a Spanish village art center (Jon Sullivan)

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STEAM Meeting in New England

Fern Specimens, Chromolithograph, L. Prang & Co., Print Department, Boston Public Library

Fern Specimens, Chromolithograph, L. Prang & Co., Print Department, Boston Public Library, 1861-1897 (approximate)

This fall, Gavin Andrews (of the Peabody Essex Museum) and I gave a presentation on STEAM at the New England Faculty Development Conference.  Coincidentally, this June the NEFDC conference will be on the topic of Moving from STEM to STEAM: What Really Works (http://www.nefdc.org/spring2014conf.html).

The keynote speaker is Tom Pilecki, who was the director of the Center for Creative Education for twelve years, and is the co-author of the book “From STEM to STEAM: Using Brain-Compatible Strategies to Integrate the Arts” with David Sousa (http://www.corwin.com/books/Book239445). Interestingly, he was founder and principal of the St. Augustine School for the Arts, which was the focus of the 1993 documentary entitled “Something  Within Me”, a film that won the Sundance Film Festival Audience Award, Filmmakers Trophy, Special Jury Prize (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108183/?ref_=nm_flmg_slf_1).

The conference will take place at Roger Williams University (http://rwu.edu) in Rhode Island, and the call for proposals ends February 23. The tiny coastal state of Rhode Island is also home to RISD (http://www.risd.edu), a great champion of STEAM, so perhaps some RISD folks will attend the meeting?

Hope to see you there.

Art Science Movers and Shakers at an Arts University

Portrait of Felix Nadar (1820-1910), Photographer, Playwright, and Aeronautical Scientist.

Portrait of Felix Nadar (1820-1910), Photographer, Playwright, and Aeronautical Scientist.

Whoa. Why did it take me so long to come across ArtSTEM?? ArtSTEM (http://www.artstem.org) is a project led by science faculty member, Dr. Janna Levin (http://www.uncsa.edu/academicprograms/faculty27.htm), and a history faculty member, Michael Wakeford (http://faculty.uncsa.edu/generalstudies/wakefordm/), at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (http://www.uncsa.edu). It’s alway a pleasure to find a STEAM-related project that is led by both a scientist and someone from the humanities. Without both of those perspectives in the leadership, sometimes the approach is too one-sided and the project’s efforts fail to effectively communicate clearly across disciplines.

ArtSTEM faculty projects involve arts high school and university students in a great variety of projects including plays about the process  of science, food science and food presentation, the intersection of anatomy & physiology with dance, the intersection of judo with physics, short films on science that use animation and puppetry, the art and technology of sound, the sonification of solar data, and the aesthetics of regulation in architecture.

ArtSTEM is even offering what looks like a very interesting course this coming semester. I encourage you to read the course description!  http://www.artstem.org/2013/04/22/artstem-course-planned-for-spring-2014/

Professional Artists as Collaborators

I went back and forth on whether to write this post at this point in time. You can see that I have two recent posts on collaboration, but then I left the subject to write about grading. I hesitated to write on this topic because I haven’t actually collaborated with a professional artist outside of academia yet. However, I have stuck my toe in the water and it feels nice, so this post is mainly forward-looking.

Wolf Trap National Park sign (Gregory F. Maxwell)  Did you know that the United States has a national park for the Performing Arts?

Wolf Trap National Park sign (Gregory F. Maxwell) Did you know that the United States has a national park for the Performing Arts?

So far, I’ve considered this type of collaboration for a professional development program supporting K12 teachers. As part of some very preliminary planning, I decided to take an informal poll of several of my artist friends and acquaintances to see if they might have an interest in helping to lead teacher-training workshops. I asked two dancers, a writer, a writer/actor/director, a cinematographer, a singer/guitarist/song-writer, and graphic designer their thoughts. To my great shock and surprise, every one of them expressed an interest!

So, the main challenge here is probably not recruiting interested artists. Rather, the challenge is likely to be in paying them properly. For each of these people, time is money and any commitment outside of their art must, understandably, make economic sense.

In K12 schools, there are many Artist in Residence programs. The Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts (http://www.wolftrap.org/Education/Institute_Professional_Development.aspx) supports residencies for artists in early-childhood classrooms with a focus on STEM education in particular. As I mentioned in an earlier post (https://stemtosteamihe.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/sunny-days/) there are some reasons to see these early childhood models as relevant to higher education. I can see an artist leading a workshop or a series of workshops for faculty professional development at my university sometime in the near future.

Well, that’s all I have to say on that subject for now. Maybe you have something to contribute?

P.S. I should mention that many professional artists could use assistants. You may want to send some of your STEM students their way.